Something in Common

Published Friday, April 15, 2011 by Tarang

Recently, I watched a charming Dianna Agron (Glee) interview on Jimmy Kimmel Live. She was refreshingly poised and humble, especially when she told her tale of hanging out with Beyonce and Gwyneth Paltrow in the bathroom. Apparently all the Glee girls, Gwyneth, and Beyonce were in the bathroom together to fix someone’s dress when suddenly someone popped out a box of mints. Dianna noticed how Beyonce took a mint just like a regular person, and Dianna felt like Beyonce was one of them. You can check out the beginning of the interview here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9lqY-oNbfk8

Her story brought up a good point. We all have something in common-  we’re all normal people. Part of that is we all have to take the SAT/ACT and a whole other slew of standardized tests. The bright side is that famous people have to take the SAT too. While taking the test is annoying at first, who knows what it could lead to next? Check out these famous people’s SAT scores. Please note that these people took the test when it was out of 1600.

Before he was Vice President or making documentaries, he was a high school student. Al Gore scored a 1355. And while Gore was VP, the country’s former President Bill Clinton was sitting pretty on a 1032. John Kerry also took the SAT and scored a 1190. Actress Courtney Cox got a 1150 before she started playing Monica on Friends. Another President George W. Bush did well with a 1206. Microsoft’s founder Bill Gates was a bona fide genius with a score of 1590. Fellow CEO of Sun Microsystems Scott McNealy scored high with a 1420.

If you’re wondering where I got these scores, just search the Internet and you’ll see these scores everywhere. Are they true? I don’t know. But the point is that all of these famous and influential people took the SAT and went to college just like you. Their scores did not determine their whole lives, but a good score sure helped them along the way. Look at Bill Gates’ SAT score if you need proof.


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