Breaking Down Vocabulary

Published Friday, January 23, 2015 by Alina Krjukova

So you’ve been studying your vocabulary list for the last few weeks, and you have a pretty good hang of it. You know the definitions, and you feel pretty comfortable about understanding the words in context, but what about the other hundreds of thousands of words in the English language? One thing that you can do to prepare yourself for a run-in with the more remote words is learn to dissect words and figure out their meanings based on the roots. By dividing words into familiar parts, you can learn how to decode even the… Continue Reading

National Merit Scholarship Cutoff Scores by State

Published Thursday, October 2, 2014 by Rakhi

Students who took the PSAT in October of this year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 …..and are graduating (graduated) in this year. 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 Alabama 211 209 211 210 208 209 209 Alaska 212 204 212 214 211 212 213 Arizona 214 212 213 209 210 209 211 Arkansas 205 202 205 203 203 204 201 California 223 220 221 219 218 217 218 Colorado 215 212 215 212 213 213 213 Connecticut 221 218 220 219 218 218 217 Delaware 218 215 217 215 219 219 219… Continue Reading

Upcoming Changes to the SAT

Published Friday, April 1, 2011 by Tarang

As you all know, the SAT has constantly changed itself over the years to stay alive. It went from being a 1600 point test to a 2400 point test in 2005. Instead of having only verbal and math, the SAT now has critical reading, math, and writing. The writing section includes an essay, which was not previously present. Also, the SAT added more focus on Algebra 2 in 2005 as well. Recently, the SAT has been feeling the pressure from rival standardized test ACT. The ACT also has a PSAT counterpart called PLAN, which is… Continue Reading

The National Merit Scholarship Program

Published Sunday, December 26, 2010 by Katie

The results for the 2010 PSAT/NMSQT recently were released. For the approximately 3.5 million students across the United States that took the test this past October, one question will likely come to mind: “What next?” For the 1.6 million high school sophomores (and a few precocious seventh graders, eighth graders, and freshmen) who took the PSAT, the answer is to take the test again. Before junior year, the PSAT has little significance—it merely serves as practice. However, for the 1.5 million high school juniors that endured the grueling three-hour exam, the results of the PSAT/NMSQT… Continue Reading